Social Media – just a way of killing time

Killing-timeA couple of years ago the following question was posted on the Who’s Who in Events LinkedIn group.

Is Social Media just used to kill time and find out what old colleagues are up to or does anyone, other than social media consultants, get business out of it?

While social media, and technology in general are now fully embedded in the event marketing mix, it is worth remembering that there are still a significant number of people who view it with a degree of scepticism. Following numerous stories (given much larger audiences thanks to online and social media) of data leakages and inappropriate sharing, many are much more cautious about what they put into the public domain.

Social media is a great enabler of the creation of a continuous dialogue between like-minded people which can be capitalised on to create really great live events that the attendees truly value. When many people think of social media they are just considering Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, but these are really just the juggernauts that are educating the masses in the capabilities of what social media can do.

Technology now exists that enables you to take the capabilities and structure of social media and use it to create your own network, drawing in your current attendees, other interested individuals and partner organisations. By providing them with an open and collaborative environment you can understand what it is that motivates and concerns them, and then you can deliver business services and events that match these needs.

The organisations that are currently doing this successfully are incredibly diverse: from Cancer Centers who want to know how their patients select care at their center and what they want to receive in return; to AFOLs (adult followers of Lego); and then on to large technology organisations who were creating an event for their users based on what they thought were the issues but when they stopped and listened they discovered that there were other more pressing topics that needed to be addressed.

Social media is no longer just a useful part of an event or business marketing campaign, it is the linchpin of an event or business marketing campaign. Organisers and organisations that stop shouting and interrupting (outbound marketing) and start listening and responding (inbound marketing) will be the winners in a world that has been transformed.

The answer, therefore, to our original sceptics question is:

If you are just an observer within Social Media then all you will ever be able to do is kill time and find out what old colleagues are up.  But if you use it effectively and professionally you will definitely get business out of it.

Advertisements

Social media requires you to be sociable

2015/01/img_1113-0.jpgSitting in any marketing meeting I can guarantee that one question will always be asked.

“How often do I need to Blog/Tweet/Post”

Most event marketing teams answer with “maybe a blog a month” or “a couple of tweets a week” or “the odd post every now and then on LinkedIn”. Maybe you think this is OK, possibly even a bit ambitious. Once upon a time my Granny used to send her Mum a postcard to tell her she had got back to her place of work safely after a visit home…

So, how often should you post on your social media networks? In my hunt for a definitive answer I came across this infographic from Irfan Ahmad at Digital Information World. While not specifically drawn for events, it does give a pretty clear idea that you can’t just drop the odd comment and then stay silent for the rest of the month, hoping that what you said was so compelling your audience has hung around waiting for your next proclamation.

All too often we forget that social media is made up of two very distinct elements: the media, or mechanisms through which we broadcast our messaging; and social, or the interactions we create and sustain with our community. Without the latter, the former is useless and the brand identity is akin to that of Miss Haversham – out of touch, lonely and frankly just a little bit mouldy.

In most instances, providing you aren’t hammering your connections/likes/followers with constant sales messages, it is very difficult to say ‘too much’. Unlike email or telephone marketing where the arrival of yet another sales message feels like a personal intrusion, much of what arrives via social is ambient at best. As a consumer it can feel like panning for gold, hunting out the nuggets of juicy information. What your social media marketing efforts need to do is to ensure that no matter how frequently, or when, your potential audience comes looking, you have relevant content available.

The most important thing to remember is that although you will get more coverage if you are creating a lot of content, you can also achieve a significant reach by sharing other people’s. Linking up with your friends’ friends increases your social circle much faster, and this holds true for business contacts/networks as well.

So, just how often should you be posting on social networks? My experience is primarily in the B2B marketplace and my aim is to get all of my clients:
– Blogging two or three times a week
– Pinning onto Pinterest at least 4x per week
– creating an update on their LinkedIn group/page at least twice a week
– sending out original tweets at least 3 times a day

Social media tools and scheduling can really help achieve these goals, but that’s a topic for another blog post…

How to select the best ticketing tool for conferences or exhibitions

Today we feature a guest post from Michael Heipel.  Michael is an event and marketing consultant based in Germany and these are his thoughts.

In recent years, more and more systems for delegate management, registration, ticketing and payment have entered the market. With new developments in the mobile sphere and solutions like Apple Pay coming up, the advancements will continue. Time to take a closer look at what the various systems on the market have to offer, whichfeatures are available and what are the different pricing models and ranges.

Many event planners still use home-made solutions, but they realize that with the advanced requirements from the market side, these systems are causing more problems than solutions.

At the end of the day, collecting income from delegate or visitor entrance tickets is the core process for any successful event!

Further below, you’ll find an overview of what systems are on the market. But before we come to that, let’s take a look at what are the 10 most important decision criteriawhen selecting a vendor.

10 most important selection criteria for ticketing solutions

  1. What is the business model of the solution? The most important question is of course the pricing model of the software. Many vendors charge for a setup fee in combination with a percentage per ticket sale of the turnover, plus fees for the payment processing. While that may be easy to calculate for few events, it can become quite costly when you run many events per year and the setup costs or base fees are calculated per event. Also, be aware that there may be hidden costs like training or webinars.
  2. What are the costs for your hardware and connectivity on site? Even if the ticketing software is located in the cloud and the purchase and payment processes happen entirely online, you will need devices to register and check the tickets on site. The expenses for these devices can become significant when you are tied to one particular system. Also bear in mind the cost for connectivity unless you can run the on site process entirely on local servers.
  3. How easy is it to set up registration for an event? Every vendor will tell you that this is a piece of cake, but be aware that there are quite some differences in how easy the setup for registration pages really is, especially when you have complex events with numerous options for the delegate to choose from.  This will determine if you need to install 1-2 experts on your team or if more people will be able to set up new event registration pages.
  4. How is the usability from a participants point of view? People that have started a registration process are customers that are willing to buy. That step needs to be hassle-free , and that applies to all communications (email, text messages etc.) that come along with that process. Usability aspects also apply to the check-in process on site, which needs to be quick and easy, regardless of how the participant will identify themselves.
  5. Can you link the registration system to your existing CRM system? Whatever database you use for your customer relation management (Salesforce, SAP, MS CRM, Oracle-based systems etc.), it is important that your registration tool and the information that you gather there is mirrored in your CRM system. That is not always smooth sailing…
  6. Do you need just a ticketing solution or a full event website? In the first case, the solution will be embedded on your site. Some systems, however, can be expanded to offer a full event website with additional features. That can be quite interesting if you only organize few events per year.
  7. Does the system allow for badge scanning and lead capture? Particularly at trade shows, lead generation is the key performance indicator for exhibitors’ success. Systems that offer the option to scan badges without having to rent special equipment are clearly an asset (e.g. 2D barcodes, QR codes with participants contact information).
  8. Is the system mobile-ready? In the USA, mobile devices account already for more internet traffic than desktop computers, and other parts of the world will definitely follow that trend. There are two aspects to that: Will the participant be able to get a mobile ticket on their device (e.g. iOS Passbook integration, link in a text message)? Secondly, will the registration page be responsive to any sort of device that the potential customer is using?
  9. Does the system allow for social login? People have become used to being able to login online via their Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or XING profiles, so that they don’t have to repeat basic information every time or upload pictures. While that may not be a deal breaker in case all other criteria are met for you, it is an add-on that may become more and more relevant.
  10. What kind of promotion options does the system offer? Promotion codes, loyalty programs, special offers and different pricings based on e.g. membership status are important tools to maximize the marketing impact for your event. Some systems offer viral ticketing and even affiliate programs where you can grant commissions for sales partners or other websites.

Overview of vendors on the market

Now this is a tricky one, because there are so many solutions out there…! Capterra lists 173 solutions! However, this is an attempt to give an overview of those that I find particularly relevant for conference and exhibition organizers.

Please feel free to add those that specialize on conferences and exhibitions in the comments section, I’ll be happy to include them in the list.

Listed in alphabetic order.

Bookitbee

Very easy to set up and providing a responsive registration page, Bookitbee is an interesting option for organizers that stage only few events and don’t want to go through the hassle of a complicated setup process.

bookitbee-example-event

Pricing: 0,75 EUR/ticket plus 2% service fee plus 3,4% credit card processing.

Website

Blog

Brown Paper tickets

With this solution, there is no additional charge for credit card processing. So the cost is quite low overall. Also, it features a lot of customization, promotion and mobile options. Free iPhone and Android barcode scanning apps are provided for scanning at the doors.

BPT_services_web_graphic

Pricing: 0,89 EUR per ticket plus 3,5% of ticket sales price

Website

Twitter

eReg / eTouches

The registration software eReg is part of a bigger software package. The options are quad, pro and plus+. The basic package quad also includes a tool to create an event microsite, a tool for email marketing and a survey tool.

Pricing: Upon request

Website

Twitter

eve.CheckIn

Primarily used by corporates like SAP, Vodafone, Hagebau, Volkswagen or Sony, eve is a delegate management software suite that also covers ticketing. The supplier is a subsidiary of Deutsche Messe AG called event it. Due to the structure of their clients, the software is highly customizable and can be adjusted to all kinds of requirements.

141020_-_Vodafone_-_Enterprise_Innovation_Tour_-_1

 

Pricing: Upon request

Website

Facebook

Eventbrite

One of the biggest suppliers, Eventbrite is pretty strong in mobile apps for event registration and management. Having processed already more than 160 Mn event tickets worldwide, you can be pretty sure that there are experienced people at work! Check-in can be done via a mobile solution for the iPad.

about_tickets

 

Pricing (EURO-zone): 2,5% service fee plus 0,75 EUR/ticket plus 3,5% in case Eventbrite is used for payments, too.

Website

Twitter

Fairmate by dimedis

This solution is tailored to the demands of trade show organizers, therefore you’ll find Reed Exhibitions, Messe Düsseldorf, Koelnmesse, Stockholmsmässan or Westfalenhallen Dortmund on their customer list. The registration part covers social login, online shop, mobile shop, voucher processing and of course a comprehensive on site check-in system.

Pricing: Upon request

Website

Blog

GrouponLIVE

Up to now, Groupon has been used primarily for concerts or sports events tickets – last minute sales. However, since October 2014, the daily deal platform has expanded it’s activities in the events business in Germany. They are of course not a ticketing software as such, but I know that the German association DLG have sold many tickets for their large exhibitions like Agritechnica via Groupon. It is an interesting option for conferences and trade shows, even though you need to give a significant discount on the official ticket price plus a commission for Groupon. The platform has also been used to offerVIP tickets to the New York Wine and Food Festival.

dealbuilder

Pricing: Upon request

Website

Twitter

Livebuzz

This company provides event registration software, event websites, development consultancy and staffing services. They handle more than 1 Mn registrations per year. Special features are SocialBuzz (integrated social media marketing tools) and secure storage on Symantec servers. Livebuzz was used at EIBTM 2014 in Barcelona.

EIBTM 2014

Pricing: Upon request

Website

Twitter

Ticketscript

The key feature of Ticketscript is an on-the-door sales app called ticketscript box office. See more in the video below. Apart from that, it offers e- and mobile tickets, promo codes, and a fully customizable responsive online ticket shop.

Pricing: 1,50 EUR/ticket plus 3,5% to cover service and all payment methods

Website

Twitter

TicketSource

A long list of features, ticking boxes like Passbook integration, text ticket to mobile phone, print-at-home, unique 2D barcodes and much more. There is even a telephone box office service provided upon request.

thermal-ticket-sample

Pricing: 3,85% – 9,09% depending on the ticket price

Website

Blog

Ticket Tailor

A completely different pricing model is offered by this company: They charge a flat fee per month, depending on how many events you have on sale in parallel. Prices range from 18 EUR per month up to 115 EUR per month when you have up to 50 events on sale in parallel.ticket tailorPricing: see above

Website

Blog

WEEMSS

A special feature of this solution is that it offers the registration process in 40 languages and accepts more than 160 currencies with exchange rates updated hourly. The system also offers interesting features for event promotion, like conversion triggers (special short marketing messages displayed on the registration page).

Advanced_marketing_tools_3Pricing: 2,5% per ticket. Currently no payment processing, funds go directly to the organizer.

Website

Blog

XING Events

Also known as Amiando (before it was purchased by the social network XING), XING Events is  highly integrated in the Germany-based social channel, the number 1 business network for the German speaking markets. That makes it pretty interesting when you are active in those markets only. It allows set up of ticket shops both on XING and on Facebook. The function people2meet suggests interesting contacts, giving a delegate sustained benefit from an event participation.

csm_App-Homepage_Teaser_DE_7a8b09b5d0

Pricing: 0,99 EUR/ticket plus 2,95% service fee plus 2,95% for payment processing

Website

Twitter

Yapsody

An interesting solution for concerts and any kind of reserved seating events, Yapsody comes with mobile apps, an integration in MailChimp and social media channels, e-ticketing and a lot more. The option to give donations via the online store makes it interesting for non-profits, too.

Pricing: 0,75 EUR/ticket plus 2,5% service fee

Website

Twitter

To contact Michael, email Michael@CoCoSocial.de or follow him on Twitter @michaelheipel

 

Leading from the front…

… or bringing up the rear?End of a race

If you don’t spot the innovation coming you can pretty much guarantee that you have missed the big growth curve.  But that might be OK for you, if you are happy just riding along on the end of the wave.  It’s not as exciting though is it?

And if you are producing the same events, magazines and marketing you were 10 years ago, clinging onto an old business model that is still delivering the goods (just) you are definitely stuck.

Stuck in the mud. Stuck in a rut. Stuck in a working pattern that is ignoring the fundamental shift in business practices that is happening all around you if you would only stop and look and listen.

And changing it is.  So fundamentally and radically that in five years time the media landscape will be unrecognisable.  LinkedIn and Facebook, and other networking sites, will be the new broadcast media pushing groups of likeminded, engaged and empowered communities to their own networks; instant online solutions will deliver knowledge sharing and collaboration across national and cultural boundaries.  It will be a very small world indeed.

So where will you be?  At the forefront of this global revolution or sitting on the sidelines waiting for someone to tell you what to do, or worse sitting there because everything your business is built on today simply vanished overnight?

Killing time…

The following question was posted today on the Who’s Who in Events LinkedIn group and it gives some food for thought.

Is Social Media just used to kill time and find out what old colleagues are up to or does anyone, other than social media consultants, get business out of it?

What is most interesting about the post is that it illustrates how much work is ahead of us before the marketing revolution that is social networking has filtered down to all areas of business.

While social media is transformational, the motivation behind it is not revolutionary in that it simply taps into our most basic human instinct to engage and connect.  It enables the creation of a continuous dialogue between like-minded people which in the live arena can be capitalised on to create events that the attendees truly value.

When many people think of social media they are just considering Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, but these are really just the juggernauts that are educating the masses in the capabilities of what social media can do.

Imagine what you can do if you extract the technology of social media, using it to create your own network, drawing in your current attendees, other interested individuals and partner organisations. By providing them with an open and collaborative environment you will be able to understand what it is that motivates and concerns them, and then you can deliver business services and events that match these needs.

The organisations that are currently doing this successfully are incredibly diverse: from Cancer Centers who want to know how their patients select care at their center and what they want to receive while undergoing treatment; to AFOLs (adult followers of Lego); and then on to large technology organisations who were creating an event for their users based on what they thought were the issues but when they stopped and listened they discovered that there were other more pressing topics that needed to be addressed.

Social media is no longer just a useful part of an event or business marketing campaign, it is the linchpin of an event or business marketing campaign. Organisers and organisations that stop shouting and interrupting (outbound marketing) and start listening and responding (inbound marketing) will be the winners in a world that has, despite what the ostrichs may be thinking, already altered beyond all recognition.

hellen @missioncontrol